H1N1 Update

Grrrrrrrrr…Ok, preggos, you know you’re not a candidate for the FluMist form of the vaccine, because it contains a live, attenuated virus. However, it appears the injectable form of the vaccine, the one that you can get, has been delayed. Again.

Here in Texas, the counties have been warned that they won’t see any H1N1 shots until November. It’s the same everywhere else.

Frustating!

You can look up when the vaccine will be arriving in your state here. I caution you, however, these may not be updated. The delivery dates for Texas have not been updated.

Also, it turns out the underlying condition present in a majority of the kids who end up in the hospital with swine flu is asthma. Kids with asthma also need the shot. The can’t have FluMist.

So, again, grrrrrr……

There finally is some suggestions about why H1N1 is so hard on pregnant women. This is from Anne Schuchat at the Centers for Disease Control.

First, pregnancy itself changes a woman’s immune system, keeping her body from having an immune reaction to the baby. Secondly, as the pregnancy progresses, the baby presses upwards on its mother¹s lungs, making it harder for her to breathe deeply. Pregnant women need to contact their health care provider if they are experiencing difficulty breathing and fever, Schuchat says.

The thing is, the same is true for the seasonal flu, so I’m not sure that we’ve gotten any real info here.

The alarming figure from this story has nothing to do with pregnant women or with kids who have asthma. It’s about everyone else. The CDC says 45% of those hospitalized with H1N1 have no underlying conditions.

I have a call in to an epidemiologist to find out if this is our of an overabundance of caution because of all the coverage swine flu is getting, or because this flu is tougher on healthy people than experts thought it would be. I’ll post it to the Pea in the Podcast blog when I get it.

In the meantime, remember, a person with Swine Flu is contagious for 24 hours before they have any symptoms, so practice good clean hand hygiene. WASH OR SANITIZE YOUR HANDS BEFORE YOU TOUCH YOUR FACE. Seriously, that’s hard because we touch our faces all the time. But it’s important.

If people are coughing or sneezing, walk away.

If you are coughing or sneezing, please do it into your sleeve and not your hands. After all, you may be the one who is incubating H1N1! ;)

My previous blog postings on H1N1 can be found at the following links…

Listen to the advice of an obstetrician here

Listen to the inside scoop about the clinical vaccine trials on pregnant women with one of the doctors working on them here

And listen to a nationally recognized pediatrician give some controversial advice regarding the H1N1 vaccine here

I urge you to add the Pea in the Podcast blog to your internet favorites. I will keep you hooked up with all of the latest news on pregnancy and parenting…and I am following the H1N1 vaccine story for you very closely. Everything you need to know is here. :)

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